The NRN wants YOU to join our committee!

The NRN is seeking a new committee member to assist with our livestreaming programme.

A sub-committee of the Society for Theatre Research (STR), the New Researchers’ Network (NRN) is a supportive group of postgraduates, new scholars, practitioners, artists and early career academics with shared interests in theatre and performance, theatre history, and theatre historiography. The NRN is comprised of individuals from a variety of academic disciplines including Theatre, Drama, and Performance Studies, History, Art History, English Literature, and Modern Foreign Languages as well as theatre and performance professionals.

The NRN meets throughout the year for a series of study days, workshops, lectures, archive visits, theatre tours, and social dinners. The calendar of events is designed to encourage members to share knowledge and ideas, provoke discussion and debate, and develop a network of helpful and supportive contacts. Members of the NRN are also members of the STR, and as such are encouraged to participate in STR activities, including the lecture series, the Poel Workshops, the Research Awards, and theatre-related outings. Finally, the NRN provides opportunities for new researchers to present their current research in a more formal setting at the annual symposium.

The NRN is currently recruiting a new committee member specifically to assist with the livestreaming of the STR lecture series. The role would therefore suit a postgraduate, early career researcher, or young professional with interests in digital media, livestreaming, and/or audience development. As a full member of the NRN Committee, you will also be involved in planning the annual symposium and other events, keeping up the NRN’s online presence, and thinking ahead to the 2017/18 academic year.

This role will require the new committee member to undertake NRN activities in central London approximately once per month, and so we are expressly seeking someone London-based or with easy access to London.

To apply, please send a CV and a brief letter of application to the NRN Committee at nrn@str.org.uk by 5:00pm on Friday 30th December. We will inform candidates of our decision by Friday 6th January.

 

If you have any questions or would like more information about the role, please don’t hesitate to get in touch at the email address above.

STR Lecture Series 2016: ‘Re-evaluating the Actresses’ Franchise League: Suffrage Theatre, Networks and Activism’

You are warmly invited to the next talk of the 2015-16 Society for Theatre Research annual lecture series, which takes place on Wednesday 13 April 2016 at 7.30pm at the Swedenborg Hall, 20 Bloomsbury Way, London WC1A 2TH.

DR NAOMI PAXTON will present ‘Re-evaluating the Actresses’ Franchise League: Suffrage Theatre, Networks and Activism’

The Actresses’ Franchise League was formed in 1908 by a group of theatre professionals keen to support the work of the suffrage societies. Neutral in regard to tactics, the variety of their work and contributions to the performative propaganda of the suffrage movement shows an organisation embracing new forms, new spaces, new ideas and new audiences. This lecture will explore the work of the Actresses’ Franchise League, the networks created by and through the League and the organisation after 1918, drawing on both suffrage and theatre histories to tell the story of suffragist actresses and actors and their political activism.

Dr Naomi Paxton is an actress, performer and researcher and has appeared in the West End and on tour in the UK and internationally. She has shared her passion for the work of the Actresses’ Franchise League at many events, including the National Theatre, Hay Festival and Latitude Festival and was one of the AHRC/BBC Radio 3 New Generation Thinkers for 2014-15. From 2015-16 she was Research Associate for the AHRC funded project Poor Theatres at the University of Manchester. Naomi edited The Methuen Drama Book of Suffrage Plays (Bloomsbury, 2013), is an Associate Artist of the feminist production hub Scary Little Girls and is currently Cultural Engagement Fellow at the School of Advanced Study, University of London.

The talk will be livestreamed here: https://livestream.com/accounts/6741029/events/5156919

These events are free and open to everyone. For further information about the STR and events see the society’s website: http://www.str.org.uk/.

STR Lecture Series: ‘The Development of Professional Stage Management’

The next talk of the 2015-16 Society for Theatre Research annual lecture series takes place on Thursday 10 March 2016 at 7.30pm at the Swedenborg Hall, 20 Bloomsbury Way, London WC1A 2TH.

DR TRACY CATTELL will present ‘THE DEVELOPMENT OF PROFESSIONAL STAGE MANAGEMENT’

Primary evidence from the earliest theatre-based companies in Britain indicates that ever since there have been professional theatres, there has been professionalstage management.  This lecture will explore the development of professional stage management in this country by considering primary sources that demonstrate its progression since the late sixteenth century, drawing on the earliest surviving prompt copies to reveal how the first theatre-based companies were supported in their performances by an infrastructure that is recognisabletoday as stage management.

Dr Tracy Cattell is a professional Deputy Stage Manager whose experience ranges from subsidised repertory and theatre-in-education to opera and daily repertoire, in which genre she continues to practise on a freelance basis.  She undertook her doctorate at the University of Warwick and has a particular research interest in the development of cued performance.  She lectures on the practical staging of Shakespeare, contemporary and historical stage management practice, and the interpretation of promptbook annotations, and enjoys sharing her research and professional heritage with professionals in training.  She is a member of the Theatre History & Historiography Working Group of the Theatre and Performance Research Association, and the Society for Theatre Research’s New Researchers’ Network.

If you are unable to attend in person, the lecture will be live streamed and can be accessed at: https://livestream.com/accounts/6741029/events/4906757

Forthcoming talk for your diary:

• Wednesday 13 April: Dr Naomi Paxton, ‘Re-evaluating the Actresses’ Franchise League: Suffrage Theatre, Networks and Activism’

These events are free and open to everyone. They commence at 7.30pm in the Swedenborg Hall, Holborn. For further details see the STR’s website: http://www.str.org.uk/.

Join our Committee & Contribute to our Network!

The NRN is seeking a new committee member to assist with our livestreaming programme.

A sub-committee of the Society for Theatre Research (STR), the New Researchers’ Network (NRN) is a supportive group of postgraduates, new scholars, practitioners, artists and early career academics with shared interests in theatre and performance, theatre history, and theatre historiography. The NRN is comprised of individuals from a variety of academic disciplines including Theatre, Drama, and Performance Studies, History, Art History, English Literature, and Modern Foreign Languages as well as theatre and performance professionals.

The NRN meets throughout the year for a series of study days, lectures, archive visits, theatre tours, and social dinners. The calendar of events is designed to encourage members to share knowledge and ideas, provoke discussion and debate, and develop a network of helpful and supportive contacts. Members of the NRN are also members of the STR, and as such are encouraged to participate in STR activities, including the lecture series, the Poel Workshops, the Research Awards, and theatre-related outings. Finally, the NRN provides opportunities for new researchers to present their current research in a more formal setting at the annual symposium.

The NRN is currently recruiting a new committee member specifically to assist with the livestreaming of the STR lecture series. The role would therefore suit a postgraduate, early career researcher, or young professional with interests in digital media, livestreaming, and/or audience development. As a full member of the NRN Committee, you will also be involved in planning the annual symposium and other events, keeping up the NRN’s online presence, and thinking ahead to the 2016/17 academic year.

This role will require the new committee member to undertake NRN activities in central London approximately once per month, and so we are expressly seeking someone London-based or with easy access to London.

To apply, please send a CV and a brief letter of application to the NRN Committee at nrn@str.org.uk by 5:00pm on Friday 5 February. We will inform candidates of our decision by Friday 12 February.

If you have any questions or would like more information about the role, please don’t hesitate to get in touch at the email address above.

STR Lecture Series: ‘Screening Sarah Bernhardt: Reinterpreting Acting on Silent Film’

The next talk of the 2015-16 Society for Theatre Research annual lecture series takes place on Tuesday 19 January 2016 at 7.30pm at the Swedenborg Hall, 20 Bloomsbury Way, London WC1A 2TH.

DR VICTORIA DUCKETT will present Screening Sarah Bernhardt: Reinterpreting Acting on Silent Film’

Sarah Bernhardt, the great nineteenth-century theatrical actress, was also the first major international film star. Appearing cross-dressed in a short Hamlet film before international audiences at the Paris Exposition of 1900, this 56-year-old French actress most famously went on to make Camille (La Dame aux Camélias, 1911) and Queen Elizabeth (Les Amours de la Reine Elisabeth, 1912).  Later appearing in one of the first celebrity home movies (Sarah Bernhardt at Home, 1915), she also made a WWI propaganda film, Mothers of France (Mères Françaises, 1917). This presentation explores these films as evidence of a productive exchange between the stage and the nascent film industry. Rather than see Bernhardt’s acting as evidence of the theatre’s incommensurability with film, it will demonstrate the legacy of her stage acting as she adapted it to early film. The talk will include screenings of the films accompanied by live music.

Dr Victoria Duckett is a lecturer in Media and Communications in the School of Communications and Creative Arts at Deakin University, Melbourne. She is author of Seeing Sarah Bernhardt: Performance and Silent Film (2015) and co-editor of Researching Women in Silent Cinema: New Findings and Perspectives (2013). Victoria is on the editorial boards of Feminisms, Medias, Histories and Nineteenth Century Theatre and Film and is a member of the steering committee of Women and Film History International.

The talk will be livestreamed: http://livestream.com/accounts/6741029/events/4679420

 

Forthcoming talks for your diary:

  • Thursday 11 February, Dr Kate Dorney, ‘Excavating Enthoven: the Life and Times of a Theatre Collector’

 

  • Thursday 10 March, Dr Tracy Cattell, ‘The Development of Professional Stage Management

 

  • Wednesday 13 April, Dr Naomi Paxton, ‘Re-evaluating the Actresses’ Franchise League: Suffrage Theatre, Networks and Activism’

These events are free and open to all. They commence at 7.30pm in the Swedenborg Hall, Holborn. For further details see the STR’s website: http://www.str.org.uk/.

 

STR Lecture Series 2015-2016 // ‘Fighting Talk — The Secrets of Stage Combat Revealed’

The first talk of the 2015-16 Society for Theatre Research annual lecture series takes place tomorrowTuesday 13 October at 7.30pm at the Swedenborg Hall, 20 Bloomsbury Way, London WC1A 2TH

TERRY KING will present ‘Fighting Talk – The Secrets Of Stage Combat Revealed’

Live theatre relies on the skill and creativity of the fight director to choreograph scenes of violence and to train actors in the safe execution of physical combat. This talk, given by one of Britain’s pre-eminent practitioners, offers an opportunity to hear about how stage fights are put together, to participate in some simple demonstrations, to ask questions or just observe.

Terry King has worked as a Fight Director at all the major theatre companies in Britain with extensive credits for productions with the RSC and National Theatre. Tackling everything from the classical repertoire to soap opera, he has worked on numerous operas and West End musicals and in film and television.

The event is free and open to all.

For those who cannot attend in person, please feel free to join in online via our live streaming link:

http://livestream.com/accounts/6741029/events/4419977

LiveStream our symposium!

Here are the links for livestreaming our symposium on Friday! The updated programme is here for your perusal too.

So, no matter where you are, no matter how far you may be, you can join in the event! If you’re inclined to tweet, our hashtag is #nrnarchives: we look forward to seeing your comments throughout the day.

Our keynote and panel sessions will take place in the East Lecture Theatre and South Lecture Theatre respectively. Use the programme as your guide as to which panels you want to tune into.

East Lecture Theatre

South Lecture Theatre

STR Lecture Series 2015: ‘Beckett Goes Nude: Breath, Oh! Calcutta! & the Sexual Revolution’

The Society for Theatre Research invites you to the next event in its lecture series:
Beckett Goes Nude: Breath, Oh! Calcutta!  & the Sexual Revolution
Thursday 16 April 2015 at 7.30pm, Swedenborg Hall, London
Presented by Dr Graham Saunders
Most theatre audiences first introduction to Samuel Beckett’s drama in the early 1970s come not from major works such as Waiting for Godot or Endgame, but a ‘dramaticule’ lasting less than forty seconds. The piece, entitled Breath reached mass audiences worldwide due it opening an erotic revue, Oh! Calcutta! devised by the theatre critic Kenneth Tynan. The show was heralded as landmark cultural event in espousing the spirit of sexual liberation that came to define the late 1960s. It opened in New York, but its original conception and many of its themes and preoccupations where definably British and its impetus came out of the struggles against the system of theatre censorship that existed in the UK until 1968.
Drawing extensively on archival sources including the Kenneth Tynan and Harold Pinter collections at the British Library as well as the Beckett archive at the University of Reading, this lecture will look in detail at Beckett’s somewhat unwilling secondment into the mores of the late 1960s’ sexual revolution through his involvement in Oh! Calcutta! Beckett’s own seeming estrangement from the utopian ideals of the times will also be framed through many of the contradictions thrown up by Tynan’s erotic revue.
Graham Saunders is Reader in Theatre Studies at the University of Reading. He is author of Love me or Kill me: Sarah Kane and the Theatre of Extremes (Manchester: MUP, 2002), About Kane: the Playwright and the Work (London: Faber 2009), Patrick Marber’s Closer(Continuum, 2008) and co-editor of Cool Britannia: Political Theatre in the 1990s (Palgrave, 2008) and Sarah Kane in Context (MUP, 2010). He was Principal Investigator for the five year AHRC funded ‘Giving a Voice to the Nation’: the Arts Council of Great Britain and the Development of Theatre & Performance in Britain 1945-1994’ and is currently co-investigator on the three year AHRC funded project Staging Beckett: The Impact of Productions of Samuel Beckett’s Drama on Theatre Practice and Cultures in the United Kingdom and Ireland.
The event is free and open to all. Can’t make it? Livestream it here: http://new.livestream.com/accounts/6741029/Beckett/statuses/82195444

STR Lecture Series: ‘The Gladiator, the Indian, the Dutchman and Shakespeare: Three American Actors in Nineteenth-Century England’

The next Society for Theatre Research lecture will be:

The Gladiator, the Indian, the Dutchman and Shakespeare:  Three American Actors in Nineteenth-Century England

Wednesday 11 March 2015 at 7.30pm, Swedenborg Hall, London

Presented by Dr Arthur Bloom

The New York Mirror of December 4, 1880 wrote that for nineteenth-century American actors, ‘the verdict of foreigners’ was ‘the verdict of posterity’. In order to be acknowledged as a major tragedian or comedian, an American actor had to gain the respect of European, particularly English, audiences and critics. This lecture will survey the attempts of Edwin Forrest, Joseph Jefferson and Edwin Booth to find success on the English stage and will particularly focus on why Jefferson was received so positively while Forrest and Booth fought an uphill battle to gain popular and critical favour.

Dr. Arthur W. Bloom is a graduate of Dartmouth College and holds a PhD in Theatre History from Yale University. His academic career included work at Fisk University, Loyola University of Chicago, Loyola Marymount University and Kutztown University of Pennsylvania, where he served as Dean of Visual and Performing Arts. Dr. Bloom is the author of Joseph Jefferson: Dean of the American Theatre and Edwin Booth: A Biography and Performance History. In retirement he has collected over a million dollars to aid economically disadvantaged students go to college and is currently working on a biography of the early nineteenth-century American tragedian Edwin Forrest.

All welcome. Free admittance. The lecture will also be streamed live at https://new.livestream.com/accounts/6741029/gladiator-indian-dutchman (free account required).