The schedule for Marking Time is here!

We are so excited to share the provisional schedule for #NRNMarkingTime! Please note that this may be subject to change.  In any case, we cannot wait to see you all on 21 June! Don’t forget that you can still register here.

NRN Marking Time: Schedule

Time Parallel Session A Parallel Session B
10:00-10:15 REGISTRATION
10:15-10:30 Welcome: Ella Hawkins and Rachael Nicholas
10:30-11:30 Plenary

 

Professor Elizabeth Schafer: ‘Slipping Through My Fingers’: Adventures in Marking Time

11:30-11:45 COFFEE BREAK
11:45-12:45 Re-telling historical stories through 21st-century practice

Chair: Ella Hawkins

  • Naomi Paxton: Making room, finding space: explorations of the work of women theatre professionals in WW1
  • Matthew Schlerf: Activating the discourse of An Adventure, 1789-2017
New methodologies

Chair: Chris Dingwall-Jones

  • Ysabel Clare: Timelines as a research tool: spatial sorting and temporal sequences
  • Rachael Nicholas: New Media, Unfamiliar Methodologies: Understanding the Online Reception of Theatre Broadcasts Through Audience Research
12:45-13:45 LUNCH
13:45-15:15 Time, experience, and performance

Chair: Rachael Nicholas

  • Alessandra Montagner: Temporality, Experience and The Event: Time marking us
  • Maiada Aboud: Title TBC
  • Nik Wakefield: Some Time-specificities of Performance
Time in literature

Chair: Robbie Hand

  • Martin Young: Stage Managing Wasted Time: As You Like It and Theatre’s Industrial Temporality
  • Jennifer Hardy: The womb of time: Untimely Birth in Shakespeare’s Richard III
  • Carlo Vareschi: The Reluctant Anarchist: wage labour, capital and time in Tom Stoppard’s Albert’s Bridge and If You’re Glad I’ll Be Frank
15:15-15:30 COFFEE BREAK
15:30-17:00 Time and identity

Chair: Claire Read

  • Chris Dingwall-Jones: Seven times a day will I praise You: Christian liturgy and the temporal performance of identity
  • Corinne Furness: ‘I knowed all Hamlet by heart’: Fracturing time and identity in the Royal Shakespeare Company’s community plays
  • Simon Bell: Retrogardism: Re-mythologising the European Traumatic Historical in the Present
Shakespeare’s time as source material

Chair: Rachael Nicholas

  • Robbie Hand: ‘Why is everybody so obsessed with text?’: Emma Rice, the Globe, and theatre history in practice
  • Ella Hawkins: Negotiating the gap of time: developments in Jacobethanism through the history of stage and costume design for Shakespeare
  • Robin Craig: AIDs, Section 28 and Queer Futurity
17:00-17:45 Closing discussion

CFP: 4th Annual NRN Symposium, ‘Marking Time’

The Society for Theatre Research

New Researchers’ Network

Fourth Annual Symposium

Marking Time

21st June 2017

University of Roehampton 

The Society for Theatre Research’s (STR) New Researchers’ Network (NRN) is delighted to announce their fourth annual symposium, which will centre on the theme of Marking Time within performance, research, and our lives.

Time is a significant factor in everything we do. We organise our lives by dividing time into measurable units (seconds, minutes, hours, days, years), and remain constantly aware of its passing as we grow older. The societal desire to mark time also results in a culture of commemoration: prominent events and figures from the past are memorialised through anniversaries, and many organisations exist to further historical legacies.

How is time represented in contemporary and/or historical performance, and how does an awareness of time’s passing impact upon research methodologies? To what extent does our real and imagined relationship with the past impact upon contemporary culture?

Areas of interest might include (but are not limited to):

  • The significance of anniversaries and commemoration culture (i.e. Shakespeare 400, the Easter Rising centenary, and the ongoing commemoration of WWI)
  • The marking of time through space, movement, and live art
  • Popular performance and construction of legacies (i.e. Hamilton)
  • Constructing the passage of time in performance
  • Issues of marking time in methodologies in theatre and performance studies
  • Histories of theatre companies, theatre buildings, and theatre collectives
  • Genealogies of performance
  • Period dress and reconstruction; the desire to replicate obsolete theatrical and cultural practices
  • Constructing (and performing) the theatre archive
  • Time as a social construct; how we perform notions of time in our everyday lives
  • Performance that responds to critical moments in national/international history and culture (i.e. Brexit, the recent US election, the Iraq War, the Leveson Inquiry)

The NRN welcomes abstracts (maximum 250 words) for 20-minute conference presentations or creative responses that relate to the symposium theme. Abstract submissions should be directed to the NRN Committee at nrn@str.org.uk; the deadline for submissions is 23:59 GMT on Monday 22nd May. Applicants will be notified of the results by Friday 26th May. For any further details, please don’t hesitate to contact the NRN via email: nrn@str.org.uk

Tough Love: Tips on Getting Your Application Right

headshotIn anticipation of our upcoming Employability Event we asked Prof Kate Newey to give us the benefit of her experience shortlisting candidates for jobs. What we got was a combination of practical and strategic advice that we think you’d be silly to ignore!

…be ready to hear it like it is…

 

CVs – the basics

Layout, layout, layout. Make it clear and easy to get the main facts from a CV quickly. Jobs I’ve been on the selection committees for have up to 100 applications – there are some areas (eg Eng Lit) where this is doubled. If we have to hunt for information in your application, it’s not necessarily a good thing for you! If the information is unclear, or ambiguous, ditto. And I start to wonder what you’re trying to hide…

On the other hand, no whizzy showy stuff to “stand out” in that pile of 100. I can live without pictures on a CV too. We don’t need to know what you look like (Sorry <grin>).

What will stand out is a clean, professional, sensible knowledgeable CV with a clear straightforward application letter.

Always order things from the most recent to the most historic ie backwards.

Be judicious about what you include. We don’t really need to know your hobbies or your non-academic employment UNLESS you want to refer to it in your cover letter for a specific this-job-related reason. EG voluntary work is lovely, but only mention it if you’re doing such work in an area relevant to the job for which you’re applying. But I really don’t need to know that you enjoy reading (I should hope you do in this business!) or fell-walking in your job application. If you’re invited to interview, we can have a great talk about that over lunch. But don’t waste your space or my time on such stuff in your job application.

Resist, resist, really resist the urge to inflate your CV. Please.

You really don’t need to have more than you’d be expected to have in relation to your ‘career age.’ The problem with CV inflation is that you think you have to have all this stuff for a job application, but we might make a less than positive comparison between what you write and what we know to be the case: for example, book reviews are book reviews, not publications in the same way that a refereed journal article is a publication.

Just be straightforward about articles out for review: say that you’ve submitted an essay for X journal, and are awaiting readers’ reports. In the first couple of years post-PhD, we’re looking for a research trajectory, which means that you need to show you know what you’re doing & the direction you’re going in, and that you’re taking practical, concrete steps to get there eg you’re preparing a book proposal adapted or drawn from your PhD (important to show you know that your PhD is rarely publishable in its raw form!) and have submitted/about to submit to XYZ publisher. Be ready to talk about why that publisher in interview. Basically, any claim you make in your CV, be prepared to discuss in interview.

Personally I don’t like the Twitter-like biogs at the top of a CV for an academic job: just stick to the utilitarian basics.

Ditto for the summary such as “I am a highly motivated self-directed individual, able to work on multi-disciplinary project.” That sort of guff. This is for your cover letter, and needs to backed up by concrete evidence/examples. For non-academic jobs, such statements are required & useful, but for an academic job, we all know what the job is; your distinctiveness is going to be in your CV, which represents the mix of your experience so far.

Cover letters, proposals etc

Again, remember that your application or proposal is going to be one of many. So keep things clean, clear, and try to be helpful in your submissions – in that you should adhere to any directions given you about layout or word length and so on.

Simple stuff such as: if you’re submitting an electronic document, name each document with your name & what it is not just randomly “Exeter application”.

Instead, label it clearly <YOURNAME_Grant proposal Exeter 2017>

Think about what information you would need and in what order if you were managing say, 20 applications for the same thing. You’d want to be able to sort & save the documents by applicant probably.

I always prefer MSWord, rather than a PDF but check about format for sending something. Usually, if you’re asked for several parts eg Proposal, summary, and CV it makes sense to put it all in one document (as above, think of the recipient, managing 20 or a 100 such documents), each section of the document separated by a page break.

It’s all just digital good manners.

Cover letters for jobs

Be straightforward and clear, and get to the point of what you offer to the post.

Give us a one or two sentence summary of your PhD research, and what was original. Then tell us how this is relevant to a broader field. And show us/explain to us how what you’re an expert in will add to, complement, enable collaboration, challenge the students etc etc in the Department you’re aiming to join.

Think beyond your PhD. It changed your life, but your PhD won’t change the world – it’s just the start.

To be really tough on this point: when I’m chatting to ECRs informally, and even more so when I’m interviewing them for jobs, I do tend to find those who can’t look beyond their own nose – see beyond their PhD topic – can be rather <ahem> boring and a bit self-absorbed, and I do wonder what sort of a collegial sharing generous person they’re likely to be. Ditto people who are arrogant about their work, or secretive. You should be able to talk to colleagues about your work in an open, non-jargonistic way; indeed, you need to be able to explain your research to your colleagues, and enthuse your colleagues about it. One way of doing this is to have a built-in response to the “So what?” question – excite them about how your work opens up broader issues, or whatever, and so on.

It’s important because it’s a good way to conduct your professional life – it’s a good ethic to share and to engage, and to collaborate. But on a more pragmatic note, if I have concerns about your arrogance or the narrowness of research enquiry, from the way you share or don’t share in writing and in person, I’m going to probe and prod & push you in interview. Or if I can’t see, in your CV and your research forward planning, that you’re aware of the level of team work and collegiality needed as an academic, and the openness & breadth needed as a teacher, then I may not push for you to be shortlisted. With 60 or 100 candidates, we’re looking for reasons not to shortlist as much as to shortlist.

Take your work seriously, by all means, but don’t take yourself too seriously. I think if you approach it like that, you’ll find your balance.

And if you’re a man, you’ll probably have to work a bit harder at this, because you’re socialised since birth to feel self-important and necessarily of interest to others without having to try too much; it’s as well to try to be self-aware about that socialisation. Gender politics are real, and you can’t rely on the advantages of institutional sexism for very much longer. (And women, note that I am deliberately phrasing this in terms of male advantage rather than female disadvantage.)

Kate Newey

<aka the Grumpy Professor>

________________________

Kate Newey is Professor of Theatre History at Exeter. She has been a Head of Department for three different University Drama Departments (Lancaster, Birmingham, and Exeter), and has sat on appointments committees from Teaching Fellows to Professorial and other senior appointments. She is currently Director of Research for Drama at Exeter, and has led on the last 3 REF/RAE submissions for her department (2001, 2008, 2014). She was a member of the AHRC Peer Review Panel from its inception, and is a founding committee member of the British Association for Victorian Studies, and the Theatre and Performance Research Association. She was a judge for the Society for Theatre Research Theatre Book Awards (2008) and sits on the STR Research Awards sub-committee. She has taught in English and Drama Departments in Australia and the UK, and is an expert in the literature and popular culture of the nineteenth century and has published widely on Victorian theatre and women’s writing, including the books Lives of Shakespearean Actors: Fanny Kemble (editor, 2010), John Ruskin and the Victorian Theatre (with Jeffrey Richards, 2010), Ruskin, the Theatre, and Victorian Visual Culture (co-editor, 2009), Women’s Theatre Writing in Victorian Britain (2005), and Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1993). She was co-editor of Nineteenth Century Theatre and Film from 2005-2015, and led the AHRC-funded project ‘A Cultural History of English Pantomime, 1837-1901,’ 2009-2012.

UPCOMING EVENT! What Next? Life After The PhD

SAVE THE DATE! We’re very excited to announce our next event, taking place in the new year! Read on for more… *drumroll*

What Next? Life After The PhD

When is it? Saturday 11 February 2017

How long is it on for? 10am-5pm

Where is it? Murray Learning Centre, University of Birmingham

How much is it? Free!

Getting employed is hard. Whichever way you turn after completing a PhD, job markets are fiercely competitive and often seem impossible to penetrate.

What Next? Life After the PhD is an employability event aimed specifically at late-stage doctoral candidates and post-PhD early career researchers. The event will include a series of workshops and talks, a CV surgery, and a one-to-one mock interview. The content will be presented by academics and practitioners at a variety of career stages; you’ll hear from chaired professors, casual-contract postdocs, archivists, and theatre practitioners. By the end of the day, you’ll have received heaps of practical advice about landing a job, sharpening your CV, and polishing your interview skills. Whether you want to stay in academia or pursue an alternative path, you’ll walk away ready to do battle in your field of choice.

For more information, please email nrn@str.org.uk. Registration will open in the new year!

STR Lecture Series 2016: ‘Re-evaluating the Actresses’ Franchise League: Suffrage Theatre, Networks and Activism’

You are warmly invited to the next talk of the 2015-16 Society for Theatre Research annual lecture series, which takes place on Wednesday 13 April 2016 at 7.30pm at the Swedenborg Hall, 20 Bloomsbury Way, London WC1A 2TH.

DR NAOMI PAXTON will present ‘Re-evaluating the Actresses’ Franchise League: Suffrage Theatre, Networks and Activism’

The Actresses’ Franchise League was formed in 1908 by a group of theatre professionals keen to support the work of the suffrage societies. Neutral in regard to tactics, the variety of their work and contributions to the performative propaganda of the suffrage movement shows an organisation embracing new forms, new spaces, new ideas and new audiences. This lecture will explore the work of the Actresses’ Franchise League, the networks created by and through the League and the organisation after 1918, drawing on both suffrage and theatre histories to tell the story of suffragist actresses and actors and their political activism.

Dr Naomi Paxton is an actress, performer and researcher and has appeared in the West End and on tour in the UK and internationally. She has shared her passion for the work of the Actresses’ Franchise League at many events, including the National Theatre, Hay Festival and Latitude Festival and was one of the AHRC/BBC Radio 3 New Generation Thinkers for 2014-15. From 2015-16 she was Research Associate for the AHRC funded project Poor Theatres at the University of Manchester. Naomi edited The Methuen Drama Book of Suffrage Plays (Bloomsbury, 2013), is an Associate Artist of the feminist production hub Scary Little Girls and is currently Cultural Engagement Fellow at the School of Advanced Study, University of London.

The talk will be livestreamed here: https://livestream.com/accounts/6741029/events/5156919

These events are free and open to everyone. For further information about the STR and events see the society’s website: http://www.str.org.uk/.

STR Lecture Series: ‘The Development of Professional Stage Management’

The next talk of the 2015-16 Society for Theatre Research annual lecture series takes place on Thursday 10 March 2016 at 7.30pm at the Swedenborg Hall, 20 Bloomsbury Way, London WC1A 2TH.

DR TRACY CATTELL will present ‘THE DEVELOPMENT OF PROFESSIONAL STAGE MANAGEMENT’

Primary evidence from the earliest theatre-based companies in Britain indicates that ever since there have been professional theatres, there has been professionalstage management.  This lecture will explore the development of professional stage management in this country by considering primary sources that demonstrate its progression since the late sixteenth century, drawing on the earliest surviving prompt copies to reveal how the first theatre-based companies were supported in their performances by an infrastructure that is recognisabletoday as stage management.

Dr Tracy Cattell is a professional Deputy Stage Manager whose experience ranges from subsidised repertory and theatre-in-education to opera and daily repertoire, in which genre she continues to practise on a freelance basis.  She undertook her doctorate at the University of Warwick and has a particular research interest in the development of cued performance.  She lectures on the practical staging of Shakespeare, contemporary and historical stage management practice, and the interpretation of promptbook annotations, and enjoys sharing her research and professional heritage with professionals in training.  She is a member of the Theatre History & Historiography Working Group of the Theatre and Performance Research Association, and the Society for Theatre Research’s New Researchers’ Network.

If you are unable to attend in person, the lecture will be live streamed and can be accessed at: https://livestream.com/accounts/6741029/events/4906757

Forthcoming talk for your diary:

• Wednesday 13 April: Dr Naomi Paxton, ‘Re-evaluating the Actresses’ Franchise League: Suffrage Theatre, Networks and Activism’

These events are free and open to everyone. They commence at 7.30pm in the Swedenborg Hall, Holborn. For further details see the STR’s website: http://www.str.org.uk/.

STR Lecture Series: ‘Screening Sarah Bernhardt: Reinterpreting Acting on Silent Film’

The next talk of the 2015-16 Society for Theatre Research annual lecture series takes place on Tuesday 19 January 2016 at 7.30pm at the Swedenborg Hall, 20 Bloomsbury Way, London WC1A 2TH.

DR VICTORIA DUCKETT will present Screening Sarah Bernhardt: Reinterpreting Acting on Silent Film’

Sarah Bernhardt, the great nineteenth-century theatrical actress, was also the first major international film star. Appearing cross-dressed in a short Hamlet film before international audiences at the Paris Exposition of 1900, this 56-year-old French actress most famously went on to make Camille (La Dame aux Camélias, 1911) and Queen Elizabeth (Les Amours de la Reine Elisabeth, 1912).  Later appearing in one of the first celebrity home movies (Sarah Bernhardt at Home, 1915), she also made a WWI propaganda film, Mothers of France (Mères Françaises, 1917). This presentation explores these films as evidence of a productive exchange between the stage and the nascent film industry. Rather than see Bernhardt’s acting as evidence of the theatre’s incommensurability with film, it will demonstrate the legacy of her stage acting as she adapted it to early film. The talk will include screenings of the films accompanied by live music.

Dr Victoria Duckett is a lecturer in Media and Communications in the School of Communications and Creative Arts at Deakin University, Melbourne. She is author of Seeing Sarah Bernhardt: Performance and Silent Film (2015) and co-editor of Researching Women in Silent Cinema: New Findings and Perspectives (2013). Victoria is on the editorial boards of Feminisms, Medias, Histories and Nineteenth Century Theatre and Film and is a member of the steering committee of Women and Film History International.

The talk will be livestreamed: http://livestream.com/accounts/6741029/events/4679420

 

Forthcoming talks for your diary:

  • Thursday 11 February, Dr Kate Dorney, ‘Excavating Enthoven: the Life and Times of a Theatre Collector’

 

  • Thursday 10 March, Dr Tracy Cattell, ‘The Development of Professional Stage Management

 

  • Wednesday 13 April, Dr Naomi Paxton, ‘Re-evaluating the Actresses’ Franchise League: Suffrage Theatre, Networks and Activism’

These events are free and open to all. They commence at 7.30pm in the Swedenborg Hall, Holborn. For further details see the STR’s website: http://www.str.org.uk/.